15: Call It What It Is

For episode 15, Cynthia and Yvette take it back to 1857 when the Supreme Court ruled that Dred Scott, or any black person, could not be a citizen of the US (a decision later overturned by the 14th amendment), call out the FBI’s racist practices, and dive into “gaslighting.” They note the importance of unpacking the US’ horrific history of slavery, point out the dangers of complacency around government surveillance, and give tips for how to recognize when you are being GASLIGHTED.

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


Case: Dred Scott v. John Sandford

Get a quick overview of the case and read the full opinion here.

Here is the video of Ben Carson referring to enslaved people brought to the US by violent force as “immigrants.”


Current Event: “Black Identity Extremist”

Read about the FBI’s category here:

Read more about past targeting of black organizations and leaders by the FBI here: The FBI’s War on Civil Rights Leaders by Jeffrey O.G. Ogbar


Deep Thoughts: Gaslighting

gaslight
The 1944 movie!

Here’s an article that goes over gaslighting: From Theater to Therapy to Twitter, the Eerie History of Gaslighting by Katy Waldman


Recommendations

Yvette recommended watching the Maze Runner (trailer below) which is in theaters now!

Cynthia recommended supporting and buying art from @iuneveno_art (see below)! #supportblackart

Also, check out the dope podcast ¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? which is a bilingual podcast about Latinos in the Heart of our Country. If you want to hear stories of immigration, Latino art and culture, Latinos in the military and more, check it out.

10: Chiquitasode: “I’m Not Racist But…”

In this chiquitasode, Yvette and Cynthia interview professor Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, who shares the research that led to the writing of her book “Crook County: Race and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court.” She reveals the coded language used in the Prosecutor’s office to justify incarcerating black & brown folks, notes that these moral narratives are systemic, and gives warm advice for young Latinas interested in academia.


Van Cleve-MBG.jHeadshotspgCrookCounty-high resolution

​​​​Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve is an Assistant Professor at Temple University in the Department of Criminal Justice with courtesy appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Beasley School of Law. She is the recipient of the 2014-2015 Ford Foundation Fellowship Postdoctoral Award, the 2015 New Scholar Award (co-winner) awarded by American Society of Criminology’s Division on People of Color and Crime. She is also an affiliated scholar with the American Bar Foundation. Her award-winning book, “Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court” (Stanford University Press) was an NAACP Image Award Finalist, a two-time Prose Award Winner and a recent winner of three “Best Book” distinctions by the American Sociological Association. It has been featured on NBC News, MSNB’s The Rachel Maddow Show and CNN.


Send her love notes at Facebook or Twitter 


Buy Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court here. “Crook County bursts open the courthouse doors and enters the hallways, courtrooms, judges’ chambers, and attorneys’ offices to reveal a world of punishment determined by race, not offense.”


Mentioned on the episode: