17: Rest in Power Marielle Franco

On this episode, Yvette and Cynthia discuss the tragic and infuriating murder of Marielle Franco, break down the DeShaney v. Winnebago County DSS case, a due process decision born of a tragic incident of neglect that led to a young boy having permanent brain damage, and share what “democratizing knowledge” means to them.  They shame Brazil for its genocide against afro-descendants and the US for its unwillingness to affirmatively act for its people. 

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


Current Event: Assassination of Marielle Franco

marielle franco
Marielle Franco, Councilwoman in Rio de Janeiro

Read more about Marielle Franco’s advocacy, death, and response here: “Say Her Name: Marielle Franco, a Brazilian Politician who Fought for Women and the Poor, was Killed. Her Death Sparked Protests Across Brazil” by Kiratiana Freelon on The Root.

“Killing of Rio de Janeiro Councilwoman Critical of Police Rattles Brazil” by Ernesto Londoño includes the quotes from President Temer. Read it here in The New York Times.

To learn more about the military intervention in Rio de Janeiro read this: “Brazil’s Military is Put in Charge of Security in Rio de Janeiro” by Ernesto Lodoño and Shasta Darlington in The New York Times.


Case: DeShaney v. Winnebago County Department of Social Services

Read the full case and listen to the oral arguments here.

josh2
Joshua DeShaney.

Linda Greenhouse wrote a column on the legacy of Joshua’s case after his death, “The Supreme Court and a Life Barely Lived,” for The New York Times, read it here.

To learn more about the international human rights case mentioned, read here.


Recommendations

Yvette recommended Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. Buy it on Amazon here.

Cynthia recommended folks consider fostering and/or adopting.

16: Borders Aren’t Natural

In episode 16, Yvette and Cynthia shine a light on ALEC, the organization responsible for legislation like “Stand Your Ground,” reject a world with borders, and explain the recent case that permits indefinite detention of certain immigrants awaiting deportation. They warn against ALEC’s insidious agenda, discuss the importance of the right to travel, and shame the court for not finding indefinite detention unconstitutional.

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


Current Event: ALEC’s Anti-Protestor Legislation

Read more about ALEC here.


Deep Thoughts: Borders 

Read an Op-Ed in the Atlantic on a world without borders here.


Case: Jennings v. Rodriguez 

Read the Jennings v. Rodriguez decision here. 


Recommendations

Yvette recommends Real Housewives of Atlanta and the book “Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism” by Benedict Anderson.

Cynthia recommends utilizing the Calm app for meditation and general relaxation purposes.

15: Call It What It Is

For episode 15, Cynthia and Yvette take it back to 1857 when the Supreme Court ruled that Dred Scott, or any black person, could not be a citizen of the US (a decision later overturned by the 14th amendment), call out the FBI’s racist practices, and dive into “gaslighting.” They note the importance of unpacking the US’ horrific history of slavery, point out the dangers of complacency around government surveillance, and give tips for how to recognize when you are being GASLIGHTED.

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


Case: Dred Scott v. John Sandford

Get a quick overview of the case and read the full opinion here.

Here is the video of Ben Carson referring to enslaved people brought to the US by violent force as “immigrants.”


Current Event: “Black Identity Extremist”

Read about the FBI’s category here:

Read more about past targeting of black organizations and leaders by the FBI here: The FBI’s War on Civil Rights Leaders by Jeffrey O.G. Ogbar


Deep Thoughts: Gaslighting

gaslight
The 1944 movie!

Here’s an article that goes over gaslighting: From Theater to Therapy to Twitter, the Eerie History of Gaslighting by Katy Waldman


Recommendations

Yvette recommended watching the Maze Runner (trailer below) which is in theaters now!

Cynthia recommended supporting and buying art from @iuneveno_art (see below)! #supportblackart

Also, check out the dope podcast ¿Qué Pasa, Midwest? which is a bilingual podcast about Latinos in the Heart of our Country. If you want to hear stories of immigration, Latino art and culture, Latinos in the military and more, check it out.

Chiquitasode: People Carry Different Wisdom

In this final chiquitasode of the 3-part Harvard Law “Advocating Across Communities: Shared Identities, Struggles, and Imaginations”conference series, we interview Professors Montoya and Zuni Cruz about the indigenous tradition of talking circles and the inspiration it created for the dialogue circles at the conference. They emphasize the importance of listening and creating space for all to contribute.

 

Chiquitasode: We are the Trojan Horse

Las Cerebronas partnered with Harvard Law’s La Allianza to bring y’all three chiquitasodes with amazing Profes that will be sharing their knowledge at the 2018 conference, “Advocating Across Communities: Shared Identities, Struggles, and Imaginations.” In this chiquitasode, we interviewed Professors Christine Zuni Cruz and Margaret Montoya on disrupting white spaces, the overlaps and distinctions between the Latinx and indigenous communities, and the struggles of being Latina in legal academia.

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


Professor Christine Zuni Cruz

Christine Zuni Cruz (Isleta and Oke Oweengeh Pueblo) established the Southwest Indian Law Clinic in 1993  to provide students with the opportunity to practice Indian Law. She had served as a tribal judge and been in private practice for ten years prior to teaching.

In her research and teaching, Zuni Cruz, a member of Isleta Pueblo, explores law and culture, including the impact of law on Indian families, the practice of Indian Law and lawyering for native communities and the Indigenous legal tradition and modern law of indigenous peoples domestically and internationally. She has taught in Greenland, Mexico, and Canada.

She served as an associate justice on the Isleta Appellate Court for fifteen years. Previously, she was a tribal court judge with the Pueblo of Laguna and the Pueblo of Taos. She also was presiding judge with the Isleta Court of Tax Appeals and an appellate judge with the Southwest Intertribal Court of Appeals.

Zuni Cruz, the first Pueblo woman to earn tenure as a law professor, is editor-in-chief of the Tribal Law Journal, an on-line law journal dedicated to the internal law of indigenous peoples.


Professor Margaret Montoya

Margaret Montoya was part of the first group of women and men of color who attended Harvard Law School. When she graduated in 1978, she won the prestigious Harvard University’s Sheldon Traveling Fellowship that allowed her to study affirmative action in Malaysia and India.

Professor Montoya was a member of the UNM law school faculty from 1992-2012 and licensed to practice law in Massachusetts, New York, and New Mexico. She worked to create programs and partnerships to increase student and faculty diversity in law and medicine. She served for several years as the Senior Advisor to Chancellor Paul Roth in the UNM Health Science Center. She retired in 2012 but continues to work part time while also babysitting her two grandchildren.

Professor Montoya’s scholarship on issues of identity, narrative, resistance to assimilation, and racial equity in education appears in law reviews, anthologies, and casebooks and is used throughout the U.S.  Professor Montoya has been recognized with many awards by her professional peers and by the Latinx community for her academic and activist work.

My truths require that I say unconventional things in unconventional ways.

Speaking out assumes privilege.

Speaking out is an exercise of privilege.

Speaking out takes practice.”

Máscaras, Trenzas, y Greñas: Un/Masking the Self While Un/Braiding Latina Stories and Legal Discourse, 17 Harv. Women’s L. J. 185 (1994), concurrently published in 15 Chicano-Latino L. Rev. 1 (1994).


Links:

Here’s the NY Times article on Genízaros in New Mexico: Indian Slavery Once Thrived in New Mexico. Latinos are Finding Family Ties to It. by Simon Romero.

Support Deb Haaland’s campaign as she runs to represent New Mexico’s District 1 in Congress! If elected, she’ll be the FIRST Native American woman in Congress. Read about her amazing-ness here: The Candidate Who Plans to Be the First Native American Woman in Congress by Leila Ettachfini.

Chiquitasode: Listen & Be Humble

Las Cerebronas partnered with Harvard Law’s La Allianza to bring y’all three chiquitasodes with amazing Profes that will be leading their 2018 conference, “Advocating Across Communities: Shared Identities, Struggles, and Imaginations.” In part 1, we bring you an interview with Professors Steve Bender and Frank Valdes on the 14th Amendment, the role of lawyers, and the responsibility on the Latinx community to dismantle white supremacy.

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


Professor Francisco Valdes

Francisco Valdes, Professor of Law, earned a B.A. in 1978 from the University of California at Berkeley, a J.D. with honors in 1984 from the University of Florida College of Law, and a J.S.M. in 1991 and a J.S.D. in 1994 from Stanford Law School. Dr. Valdes’ work focuses on constitutional law and theory, Latina/o legal studies, critical outsider jurisprudence and Queer scholarship. Since 1995, Dr. Valdes has contributed regularly to LatCrit symposia and publications to help elucidate LatCrit approaches to knowledge-production, critical theory, and academic activism.

For a full bio and a list of publications by Professor Valdes, look here.


Professor Steven Bender

Associate Dean and Professor Steven Bender is a national academic leader on immigration law and policy, as well as an expert in real estate law. Among his honors, the Minority Groups Section of the Association of American Law Schools presented him with the C. Clyde Ferguson, Jr., Award, a national award recognizing scholarly reputation, mentoring of junior faculty, and teaching excellence. Professor Bender’s latest book, “How the West Was Juan: Reimagining the U.S.-Mexico Border”, was published in July, 2017. His extensive record of public service includes his co-presidency (2010-2012) of the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) and co-leadership of the international academic organization Latina and Latino Critical Legal Theory, Inc. (LatCrit). Born in the East Los Angeles barrio to a Mexican American single mother, he applies his life experiences to his writings.

For a full bio and a list of publications by Professor Bender, look here.


For more info on Harvard’s La Allianza & NALSA’s conference, look here.

14: If People Like Us Had Been at the Table

On this episode, Yvette and Cynthia express disappointment at the loss of net neutrality, envision a new country under a new Constitution, and explain the doctrine around cell phones and search warrants. They cry-laugh at the corporate greed behind taking down net neutrality, find strength in vocalizing their goals for this country, and give a heads up on a new form of government tracking.

Note on “Deep Thoughts” segment: We want to acknowledge that we are on stolen land in the United States and that our deep thoughts segment ignores that fact. The conversation is useful as a means of thinking about what our ideal governance structure would be for a hypothetical country, not tied to the land we call “the United States” because we believe in the principles of decolonization – of returning indigenous land to those from whom it was stolen.

Thanks to @romobeats for the intro tune!
Follow us on IG and Twitter at @cerebronas
Transition song: Ryan Little – Lucy’s Song


You can support us on Patreon here. Send us an email to cerebronas.pod@gmail.com if you’d like to buy a sticker, bumper sticker, or bookmark! Check our IG for pics!


Current Event: Net Neutrality

Here’s a really good article covering the history of net neutrality and common carriers: “Network Neutrality: A History of Common Carrier Laws 1884-2018” by Tyler Elliot Bettilyon

Here’s another good source: “Net Neutrality: What You Need to Know Now”


Deep Thoughts: Constitutional Convention

You can read the full Universal Declaration of Human Rights here.

If you’re interested in the idea of universal basic income, the Economic Security Project has some good resources, like a reading list on the subject.


Case: Riley v. California

You can get more info about the case and read the opinion here.

Here’s an article on the related case before the Supreme Court that will decide whether police need probable cause to get a search warrant tp access location information for cell phones: “Supreme Court’s Cell Phone Tracking Case Could Hurt Privacy” by Nick Sibilla.


Recommendations

Yvette recommended watching She’s Gotta Have It which is available on Netflix. Trailer below!

Cynthia recommended listening to 8tracks.com – a hub of playlists made by real humans, not algorithms. Here’s a playlist for deep studying/ writing.